AUSTRALIA

BUNYIP SIGHTINGS - IN SEARCH OF AN ORIGIN

BUNYIP SIGHTINGS

           

 
PLACE DATE BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF BUNYIP OR ASSOCIATED FIND
Swan river, W.A. 1801 Crew of the French ship Geographe went inland but ran away when they heard sounds of some great water beast coming from the reeds in the river. It was a terrible roar, "louder than a bull's bellow".
Lake Bathurst, N.S.W. 1821 Explorer Hamilton Hume's account described an animal like "some sort of manatee or hippopotamus".
Bathurst 1821-22 E.S. Hall, farmer, described strange monster he saw, in a letter to a Sydney newspaper. this made a noise like a porpoise and had a dog's head.
Fish River, N.S.W. 1823 Surveyor twice saw "an animal of prodigious length" in the river close to Bathurst road.
Lake Modewarre, Vic. 1830s Escaped convict, William Buckley, broke his spear while trying to kill one of the fabled creatures which "lurked in waterholes" and was the one thing aboriginal tribesmen feared most. This bunyip had a grey furry body, four legs, and escaped by swimming underwater.
Warrnambool, Vic 1844-45 I. Best and son saw a large black hairy animal about ten feet long in the Merri River. it made a terrible noise at night in the swamps - "enough to frighten the strongest nerves', being "similar to a bullock having a dreadful cough". Best believed it fed on the "rank herbage" of its home.
Murrumbidgee River, N.S.W. 1846 "Katenpai" or bunyip skull found on river bank after aborigines killed a strange animal; this was identified by an "expert" as the deformed head of a colt, by another as a calf skull.
Lake Timboon, Vic 1846 found, west of Lake Colack, a petrified fragment of legbone, which because of its colossal nature the natives believed to be from a bunyip - described as an amphibious creature, bird and alligator combined, with an emu's head, a long bill and claws.
Central Hill Couhntry, Vic. 1847 At request of Governor Latrobe natives drew two bunyips seen in the area. these illustrations have vanished along with details of the bunyips concerned.
Murrumbidgee River, N.S.W. 1847 Station owner reported native servants seeing "Kine Pratie" in two nearby lakes. (Lake Paika station). One described it as a dark brown calf-sized animal with a pointed head, large ears, tusks and a long neck and mane. Its movements were awkward.
Port Fairy, Vic 1848 Large brown animal with kangaroo-like head featuring an enormous mouth and a long neck and hairy mane seen by natives in the Eumeralla River. this same description was given to the animal Port Phillip aborigines called "Tunatpan".
Murray river, Vic 1848 Aborigine drew bunyip as a horse-headed, hippo-bodied animal, while another's drawing show4d an emu-headed creature.
Port Fairy, Vic 1848 bunyip "of brownish colour, with long neck, shaggy mane and heavy as a bullock".
Hawkesbury River, N.S.W. 1849 similar to above
Lake Tiberius, Tasmania 1852 Seen in shallows: creature with bulldog's head and covered with shaggy black hair. also had crooked feet.
Mount Gambier, S.A. 1853 Settler saw a strange beast more than two metres long in the lagoon near one of his stations.
Murray River, Vic 1857 Naturalist named Stocqueler sailed down river in a canvas boat and made drawings of freshwater seals. He showed these to natives who said they were bunyip's brother.
Hawkesbury River, N.S.W. 1850s Most northern seal stranding reported.
Lake Modewarre, Vic 1850s Presence of "a very extraordinary amphibious animal which the natives of Geelong District call bunyip...which appears to be covered with feathers of a dusky grey colour" in fresh water lakes of surrounding district.
Bundanoon, N.lS.W. 1850s Captured in the Shoalhaven River, 30 miles from Kangaroo River junction: a fur-seal or maned sea-lion, having travelled up-river.
Cudgenbil Hole, N.S.W. 1850s Aborigines on the Tweed Rifer near Murwillumbah feared a giant water monster which lived in a "bottomless hole" close to cedar-getters' tracks following the path of the river.
Shoalhaven River, N.S.W. 1859 Captured: a "10ft male Leopard Seal with full-grown platypus in its stomach".
Macquarie River, Tasmania 1863 "large-looking beast" with two small flappers or wings was sighted by Charles Headlam while out rowing. He estimated the beast travelled at 30 miles per hour.
Lake Tiberius, Tasmania 1860s Market gardener, Howe, while out shooting saw large beast, 5-6ft in length, splashing through the reeds and water.
Swan Bay, Tasmania 1870 Son of constable McPartland of Lakes District saw "large water animals ...within a stone's throw of the land", and splashing water up into the air. they were dark in colour with a round bulldog's head.
Warrnambool, Vic 1870 Herald correspondent aroused at night by sounds of large animal floundering in Tower Hill Lake on William Rutledge's station. he thought his horse had fallen in, but was later disturbed a dozen more times and suggested  dynamite should be used to exterminate the creature.
Lakes District, Tasmania 1870 Letter from chief Constable James Wilson to Charles Gould told of sightings by several shepherds and local residents of a sea animal "4-5ft long", with a very large black head.
Lake Alexandrina, S.A. 1870s Narrinyeri tribe dreaded "a water-spirit called Mulgewanke" who causes rheumatism. Mulgewanke was half man, half fish and instead of hair had a matted crop of reeds. His call resembled the boom of a distant cannon.
Darling Downs, Qld 1870s Blucher tribe feared a large aquatic creature called "Mochel-Mochel" with otter-like head and whiskers. Thomas Hall of Warwick heard a scream from the Gap Creek Junction hole and saw a creature similar to a "low-set sheepdog" which was the colour of a platypus.
Great Lake, Tas. 1860-70 Creature 3-4ft long with a head like a bulldog's seen frequently splashing in the lake.
Jordan River, Tasmania 1871 Several anonymous reports told of an aquatic animal the size of a calf seen in dark pools of the river.
Lake Corangamite, Victoria 1872 Geelong naturalist reported sighti8ng of an "animal like a big retriever dog with a round head and hardly any ears". (Troughton says this describes a fur seal).
Narrandera, N.S.W.   natives several times saw "wee-waa" in lagoon. this described as half the size of a retriever, its body covered with long, shiny, jet-black hair.
Wagga Wagga, N.S.W. 1872 Settlers watched creature with shiny jet-black hair swimming at high speed in the Midgeon lagoon. it was about 5ft long.
Wagga Wagga, N.S.W. 1873 Bunyips seen twice within 3 months in cowal Lake by party of surveyors, then man in a canoe. It was "like an old-man blackfellow with long, dark-coloured hair".
Dalby, Qld 1873 Creature with a seal's head and a double fin seen rising out of the water.
Crystal Brook, S.A. 1876 Unusual hairy animal seen, but Government reward of fifty pounds for capture dead or alive brought no results.
Wagga Wagga, N.S.W. 1877 Creature seen in Malmsbury Reservoir had a seal's head, with other characteristics of a seal or dugong.
Molonglo River, N.S.W. 1886 Horseman saw a "whitish" creature, about the size of a large dog, but with the "face of a child". they threw stones at it.
Euroa district, Vic 1890 Attempts by Melbourne Zoo to capture a bunnyip-like monster.
Murray River, N.S.W. 1890 Seal seen 950 miles from the sea, at Overland Corner.
Lake Burumbeet, Vic 1890s Retriever-like animal with a round head and no ears reported in lake near Ballarat.
Murrumbidgee River, N.S.W. 1890s Seal killed at Conargo, 900 miles from the river mouth. This was stuffed and put on display over the fireplace at Conargo Hotel.
North-western Australia, W.A. 1800s Captain George Grey told by local aborigines of mythical monster with supernatural powers called "Wan-gul".
Nerang River, Qld 1886 Mat Heeb while duck shooting saw monster "with a very big rough mane and an enormous long bushy tail" dive into water weeds at the edge of a lagoon.
Merry Mac Swamp, Qld 1886 Settler, Joe Daly, terrified in his tent by an animal "as big as 20 dingoes" which had a big, ugly draft-horse's head, rough mane and coat and a powerful voice, part bark, part grunt and part roar.
Pimpama Creek, Qld 1880s A bunyip with characteristics of a crocodile seen in several waterholes by farmers. this creature looked like a log floating on the surface of the water. It flattened reeds and left muddy tracks.
Tuckerbil Swamp, N.S.W.   Reported sighting near Leeton of a "two-headed bunyip which could swim both ways without changing gear"!
Great Lake, Tasmania 1932 Several typical sightings in the Waddaman Dam.
Hawkesbury River, N.S.W. 1978-9 Reports of a plesiosaurus-type creature swimming in the river not far from Sydney. Aboriginal cave paintings of this water beast exist. Known as Mirreeulla.
Ginninderra Falls, A.C.T. 1900s Strange animal the size of a 3-month-old calf seen basking on a sandbank near water's edge. The creature wriggled into the water and disappeared from view.
Queanbeyan River, A.C.T. 1900s John Gale while out duck shooting saw a big dog-like amphibian "which plunged beneath the water on seeing him approach".
Balranald, N.S.W. 1900s Teamster frightened by bunyip "with teeth like a cross-cut saw" which came out of the lagoon and bellowed at him.
 
 
IN SEARCH OF AN ORIGIN

Records indicate that the bunyip, like well-received popstars and some other unidentified mystery beasts, thrived on the popularity of revival - that is, frequent spectacular reappearances interspersed with long years of silence following the initial, sensational debut. It seems the bunyip enjoyed most consideration and publicity over the 130 year time-span between 1801 and 1930, the majority of recorded sightings being in the 1840s and 1850s, and then again in the 1870s and 1880s. These were the bunyip-fever years. However, there were a few isolated sightings in the intervening years, and up until the 1930s when people presumably found other things to think about. Documented sightings in more recent years bear uncanny resemblance to creatures found in formal zoological classification.

One could hardly be expected to formulate some well-constructed theory on the bunyip's origin and existence from the evidence on hand; since, having dismissed all accumulated bunyip knowledge fact by fact as either improbable or impossible, the remaining possibilities prove as diverse as they are confusing. for example, Barrett (1946, p10) informs his reader that: "... no two aboriginal portraits of the dreaded monster are quite alike. Nor were verbal descriptions uniform as regards details". Indeed, one could then be forgiven for supposing that the bunyip was, in fact, a freshwater seal and not some fabulous conglomerate creature of the imagination.

An animal with a seal's head, with the characteristics of a seal or dugong; with otter-like head and whiskers; which was porpoise-like and splashed water into th4e air, which was of heavy build and moved about clumsily on the shore; an amphibious beast with flippers; one which basked on the banks of lakes and rivers, roared terribly and swam fast using a double fin. Such descriptions of the bunyip were commonplace during times of frequent sightings. Time after time bunyip observers echoed one another's sentiments concerning the beast's appearance and character traits. Colourful word portraits enable us to suppose the bunyhip a seal-like creature, since by deleting features which occur only once or twice, and using others reported often, we can put together a sort of identikit pictue of the mystery beast in question.

Take the first official report of Australia's great water-beast. Research material prepared in 1940 by Gilbert Whitley of the Australian Museum notes the presence of some unseen water-creature amount the reeds of the Swan River in south Western Australia. (Elsewhere, one is taken by Whitley's much-quoted opinion that the bunyip was "thought to have been an extinct marsupial otter-like animal, rumours of whose existence have been banded down in aboriginal legends, the latter corrupted and confused with crocodiles in the north and seals in the south").

It was Whitley who thought to record the experiences of French crewmen from the Geographe who went ashore in June 18091, but ran for their lives when they hard roars "louder than a bull's bellow" coming from the nearby waterway. This report of the bunyip's sound effects has been echoed again and again, with little or no variation since that time. Whether "a voice like rumble of a distant cannon" or "similar to a bullock with a dreadful cough", whether a groan, a moan or a roar, the bunyip invariably was to blame - even though some thought the brown bittern's call responsible for these disturbing nocturnal noises. The fact that it is instinctive for male seals to protect their territorial rights by means of a few fierce warning barks and growls must not be overlooked at the stage of our investigation; for by the mid-1800s rumour was already affort that the Tasmanian bunyip was a fake and in reality no more than a freshwater seal.

It did not take long for this idea to spread to mainland Australia where as early as 1857 the naturalist Strocqueler discovered and sketched freshwater seals while on a sailing excursion down the Murray River. On showing these to the aborigines, he was reputedly told that this animal was "Bunyip's brother". Add to this the drawing, 'sixteen paces long', inscribed in the ground at Chillicum in Victoria's Western District. Aldo Massola's account in 1968 of this generous aboriginal representation speculates on its origin as an outline tracing of an actual animal carcass, the probability of its use in ceremonial rituals and also its likeness to both an emu or seal "depending upon which end one accepted as the head!".

Further evidence of the bunyip's similarity to a seal was provided in the writings of Charles Gould, son of the eminent ornithologist John Gould. While geologist for the Tasmanian government, Gould was supplied with descriptions of bunyips seen in the neighbouring Swan Bay and Great Lakes districts. From those he regarded as reliable sources he was able to determine the presence of "a large seal-like water-animal unknown to Science". In short, Gould's report of 1872 affirmed the existence of some dark-coloured animal featuring a round head like a bulldog's, two front flippers and the ability to swim very fast. However, it was decided that whereas this creature answered in general description to a seal, it did not correspond with any particular known species.

Although "... by no mans certain that the legend of the water-bunyip is based on stray seals and sea-lions since many reports came from places that these animals could not reach", (Heuvelmans, 1958, page205), Tro0ughton (1941, p196) advances the argument one step further when he advises: "Amongst seals, the nearest approach to the bunyip conception is the elephant and which is the largest of the group and so named because of the trunk-like extension of the nose of males. Early explorers found the huge creature plentiful about Tasmania and the islands of Bass Strait but settlement soon banished them from such haunts where today they would provide a great tourist attraction....

"Indeed, but for the close protection of recent years, which has enabled them to increase until some rookeries are now fully occupied, local seals might have become as much a myth to future generations as the bunyip legend they helped to inspire".

It is a fact that Captain Matthew Flinders sighted seals on and around Kangaroo Island when he landed there in 1802, and that some remain today despite extensive slaughtering campaigns of the past. Charles Sriber may have unearthed one more clue to the bunyip's whereabouts when he wrote of the strong aboriginal abhorrence of this island and its surrounding waters in The Australian newspaper, 28th march, 1981: "Mainland Aborigines never crossed the often turbulent stretch of water that separates kangaroo Island from what is known as Backstairs Passage. to them the island was a place of mystery associated with death and disaster".

On the other hand, it may be entirely coincidental that the strip of coastline south of Port Pirie should abound in both seals and bunyips! Troughton (1`941, p197) gives a most thorough appraisal of the bunyip's origin as a seal, and for that reason quote him at length: "There are numerous records of stray seals being found at considerable distances inland up freshwater streams. such occurrences in earlier times no doubt inspiored the aborigines' traditional accounts of the mythical 'bunyip'. In the Geelong Naturalist of 1896 is a report of an 'animal like a bigh retriever dog, with a round head and hardly any ears' (evidently a fur seal) being seen in Lake Corangamite, Victoria, in 1872. Many people had seen one in Lake Burumbeet near Ballarat.

"The distance stray seals will ascend streams was indicated by the capture of a four-foot fur-seal some thirty miles up the Shoalhawn at its junction with the Kangaroo River, about eight miles from Bundanoon (N.S.W.) ..... An even more surprising occurrence was the capture of a ten-foot Leopard Seal in the Shoalhaven River in 1859 with a fullgrown platypus in its stomach, proving that the ocean-going seal had travelled some distance up-river into fresh-water.

".....The most northern stranding so far recorded was of the hawkesbury River near Sydney".

Later, Bernard Heuvelmans (1958) echoes these facts, but theorises further (p209): "The sight of a sea-lion for inland would be very unusual, and it is therefore hardly surprising that these animals should be described as bunyips. It is worth recalling that when the aborigines' tales of specially formidable bunyips were investigated they turned out to be merely Indian cattle (genus Bibos), which white settlers had imported, and which had occasionally escaped and returned to a state of nature. The right of these huge and utterly unknown horned beasts terrified the blackfellows. They were quite unlike any indigenous animal and thus well deserved to be called bunyips. 

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things have been done that they were able to preach the gospel. Indeed, the missionaries also had to assume the role of doctors, nurses, teachers and public works administrators.

Certainly, the strong religious following in our island society today are testament to the perseverance of these early missionaries. Indeed, the church still continued to have an important role not only in the religious education but in the general education of so many of our people. In many cases, this has been given generously but in others in the past it has appeared to place an unnecessary impost on the local island communities. Captain Davis, in 1892, was quite critical of many of the activities of some of the missionaries on the islands he visited.

While providing useful documentation, the missionary writings on the Morning Star could by no stretch of the imagination be considered to provide an objective view of island life during this period. Certainly, there is a marked lack of balance in comments made about our island people. For example, the ruins of Nan Madol, Pohnpei (Ponape), Federated States of Micronesia, are considered to be some form of pagan, heathen temples rather than the significant place that it holds in the evolution of Micronesian people. Indeed, so much island culture had been destroyed as it was not pleasing to the missionaries and as such so many of our children will be deprived of certain aspects of our culture that were enjoyed by their forefathers. Perhaps the new nationalism among island people will go part or all of the way to restoring these cultural losses.

It is probably premature at this time to endeavour to draw lasting conclusions on the merits of the missionaries' intervention into Oceania. Clearly there have been gains and similarly there had been losses. Perhaps the gains in the form of education and language translation can one day be balanced against the loss in so many important aspects of our cultural heritage ... let us hope so!

Certainly, in my case, I would have to admit that it was my education in a missionary college - Immaculate Heart College - at Taborio, Tarawa, Republic of Kiribati, that provided the basis for my further studies abroad to enable me to undertake the things that I am presently doing. In this respect, I would like to acknowledge and thank the missionaries for this. 

What the future holds may be unclear particularly when the ocean may claim many of our islands and many of our people are still under the control of others. Perhaps by reclaiming our cultural values we can understand who we are and what the future may hold for our people of Oceania.

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Polynesia Chiefs - Rulers and Ruled Rarotonga Visit - In The Strange South Seas
Vanuatu (New Hebrides) - Tanna Visit Solomon Islands - Savo Visit
Australia - A Convict's Journey Melanesia Mission

New Zealand Visit Rotorua Visit - New Zealand
Kiribati - Christmas Island Bombers Kiribati - Christmas Island Photographs
Mangaia - Cook Islands Kiribati - Kiribati Protestant Church (K.P.C.)
Australia - Goldfields Australia - Postcards
Australia - Gold Coast Australia - Burleigh Heads, Gold Coast
Fiji - History Fiji - Discovery
Vanuatu New Postcards Tahiti Modern Postcards
Australia-Bush Characters & Customs Fiji Islands - Recollections
Australia - Aboriginal Music Australia - Aboriginal Indigenous Stories
Trobriand Islands - Erotic Life Cook Islands - Personality and Culture
Australia - European Settlement Bully Hayes-South Sea Pirate-Wreck of the Leonora
Morning Star  - Voyage of Commitment Morning Star  - Voyage of Commitment Part II
Robert Louis Stevenson - South Sea Tales - Part I Robert Louis Stevenson - South Sea Tales - Part II
Australia - Aboriginal Anthropology Polynesian Music
Australia - Colonization And Exploration Japan And The Great Pacific Conflict
Australia - Historical True Stories Melanesia Music
Australia - Bushrangers Australia - The Burke & Wills Expedition
PNG - Recollections Of A Patrol Officer Fiji - Tuvaluans In Fiji
Tonga - Tonga Visit - Vava'u Samoa - Samoa Visit - Western Samoa
Samoa - Samoa Visit - American Samoa Tahiti - Tahiti Visit - The Island of Love
Jane's Gold Coast  - Special Features & Events Tahiti - A Voyage To The Marquesas
Easter Island History Easter Island Visit
Cook Islands - Aitutaki Papua New Guinea - Gold-Dust and Ashes
Hawaii Visit Hawaii - The Big Island
Hawaii - Kauai & The Na Pali Coast Hawaii - Niihau and Lanai
About The Cook Islands About Malden island Visit
Aspects Of Oceania Australia - Government and Governors
Papua And The Pacific Australia - The Convict System
Papua New Guinea And Gold Cook Islands-Mauke, Manuwai, & Takutea

Oceania - The New Pacific Tuvalu - Nanumea Family
New Zealand - Traditional Maori Music Fiji - Cakobau's Fall and Restoration
Australia - Aboriginal Origins And Dreamtime Oceania - Polynesians
Oceania - Magic and Taboo (and Mana) Hawaii - Princess Kaiulani of Hawaii
Tonga - Australia:  Recolloections Australia - Terra Australis Incognita
Oceania - The Marine Environment Australia - Aboriginal Dreamtime
Australia - Aboriginal Anthropology Australia - Mythology - A-Z
Australia - Aboriginal Anthropology 1 Norfolk Is. First Penal Settlement (1774-1814)
About Timor Papua (Irian Jaya) History
About Kiribati About the Marshall Islands
About New Caledonia Australia - About Torres Strait
About Samoa About Hawaii
New Zealand - About New Zealand The History of The Morning Star
Fiji - About Indo-Fijians, History & Culture Papua New Guinea - About Papua New Guinea
Christmas (Kiritimati) Island - Bomb Testing Oceania Nuclear Bomb Tests
About William Henry 'Bully' Hayes Bully Hayes-South Sea Pirate-Wreck of the Leonora
Tahiti-Original Tahitian:Ancestral Traits Tahiti-First Encounter-Explorers
Hawaii-Monarchy In Hawaii Christmas (Kiritimati) & Maralinga Bomb Tests
Torres Strait Islanders & Pearling Industry Australia - Aboriginal History - North Qld
Australia - Aboriginal Traditional Society Australia - Convict Settlers
Australia - Aborigines and White Settlers Bougainville - History

Bougainville - German Era Bougainville - Mandated Territory
Bougainville - World War II Bougainville - Post-War Era
Bougainville - The Mine Hawaii-The Last Visit of Captain Cook to Hawaii
Gold Coast, Australia-Japan & Friends Day Easter Island (Rapa Nui)
Oceania-Amelia Earhart-Last Flight About the Solomon Islands
Solomon Islands -The Malaita Massacre Tahiti - Possessing
Pitcairn Descendants of the Bounty Mutineers Australia - The Batavia
Australia - Gold Coast History Pitcairn Descendants of the Bounty Mutineers 2
Australia - Aborigines Stolen Generation Tahiti - Bounty
Tahiti - Pandora Tahiti-Origin-The Coming of Man to the Pacific
Australia - Historical Events Oceania Arts
Tonga Recollections Fiji - Aspects
Cook Islands - Aspects Samoa - Aspects
Tonga - Aspects Tuvalu - Origins and Culture
Tahiti - Aspects The South Pacific
Ocean Island and Nauru Kiribati - Myths, Legends and Stories
Australia-Dorrigo National Park Australia-Mount Warning National Park
Australia-Bushranging Tahiti-More About Paul Gauguin
Australia-Aboriginal Stolen Generation Ferdinand Magellan's Voyage Round The World
Oceania-Capt. James Cook-Great Barrier Reef Oceania-Capt. James Cook-Great Barrier Reef -2
New Zealand - Aspects Australia - Governor Arthur Phillip 
New Zealand - Aspects1-8 Australia - Botany Bay 1788-1790
New Zealand - New Zealanders & Britons Australia - Botany Bay - Early Perceptions
Capt. Cook-The Great Barrier Reef  Torres Strait Visit
Papua New Guinea Visit New Hebrides (Vanuatu) Visit
Kiribati Central top
OUR PEOPLE ON THE REEF 
A Poem by Jane Resture
1999-2010

The swaying palms, the gentle surf lapping upon the sand
A gentle breeze so keen to please slowly gusts across our land
Our island home is all we have known as centuries rolled by
Our island people stood alone on reefs so barren and dry.

But as years go by we wonder why the shoreline is not the same
The things we knew as always true somehow do not remain
The breakers break on higher ground - the outer palms are falling down
The taro pits begin to die and the village elders wonder why.

For what is happening to the beautiful isles we know?
Tuvalu, Kiribati and Tokelau - the Marshall isles, that place of smiles
The rising sea will reclaim our ground - nothing but water will abound
 Our people forced to leave for higher ground.
 
While far away they pour their fumes into the clear blue sky
Not knowing and never caring why the world is beginning to die
So land of our forebears despite how much we cared for you
The time will soon be when we must bid you adieu.
 

*     *     *
 
Jane Resture
 
My Wish
Jane Resture 1999-2013
The frigate bird
The flying fish
It is time for us
To make a wish
 
And I wish for the sunrise
To be beautiful each time
With days that are perfect
And nights so sublime
 
And I wish for the sunset
To be like a long red sail
Each and every day
And you and I will always stay
Whatever we wish
Will surely come true
And I wish for happiness
For me and you
 
And I wish for the world
To live in peace
To live and love as one
To a simple beat
 
And I wish for us all
To have our lives full of love
Full of joy and happiness
And eternal love
 
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